ZAP: Art and the Queer Revolution, 1969-present

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Art and the Movement for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Rights and Liberation

This entry, "ZAP! Art and the Queer Revolution, 1969-present," is inspired by and intended to be the online lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer version of "WACK!: Art and the Feminist Revolution," the exhibit that ran from February 17 through May 23, 2008, at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, Queens, New York.[1] This entry is also inspired by the opening in March 2007, at the Brooklyn Museum, of The Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art.


This stub (incomplete, developing) entry, started by Jonathan Ned Katz on June 12, 2008), is conceived as an on-line collaboratively written history of how the gay and lesbian liberation and rights movements influenced the arts after 1969 in the United States and internationally.


This open, collectively-produced entry is intended to be the first comprehensive, historical examination of the international foundations and legacy of art influenced by the contemporary gay and lesbian rights and liberation movements. ZAP! focuses on the period starting with the Stonewall Rebellion of June 1969 and extends to June 2009, the 40th anniversary of that event.


This entry will hopefully include artists and artist groups from the United States, Central and Eastern Europe, Latin America, Asia, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. ZAP! will include work by men and women who operate and operated within the political structure of gay and lesbian liberation and rights, as well as those who did not necessarily embrace those movements as part of their practice, but were impacted by them.


This entry comprises work in a broad range of media—including painting, sculpture, photography, film, video, and performance art. The entry will point to themes based on media, geography, formal concerns, collective aesthetic, and political impulses.


OPEN ENTRY: This entry is open to collaborative creation by anyone with evidence, citations, and analysis to share, so no particular, named creator is responsible for the accuracy and cogency of its content. Please use this entry's Comment section at the bottom of the page to suggest improvements about which you are unsure. Thanks.


Please contribute to the writing of or research for this history, and, if you want to, put your name on the list of participating writers of this entry, below.


Artists' List: ZAP! Art and the Queer Revolution, 1969-present

Bibliography: ZAP! Art and Queer Revolution, 1969-present

Chronology: ZAP! Art and the Queer Revolution, 1969-present

Schlock, Schtick, Kitsch, and Cliche: Telling Bad from Good in Art Influenced by the Queer Revolution

Subjects to discuss as part of this history:

AIDS

Art and Politics in General, Art and Gay and Lesbian Politics in Particular

Articles and Books on "gay and lesbian art" and artists.

Bisexuality and "Gay and Lesbian Art." How does this fit in.

Commercial Art v. High Art

Feminism

Galleries and Gay and Lesbian Art

"Gay and Lesbian Art": Is there such a thing, and, if so, what is it?

Gay Male Artists.

Heterosexual Art History

Lesbian Artists

Leslie-Lohman Gay Art Foundation

Leslie-Lohman Gay Men's Erotic Drawing Workshop.

Museums and "Gay and Lesbian Art"

Pornography and "Gay and Lesbian Art"

"Transgender art" and artists.

Sexually explicit art.

Types of sources to Research

Articles

Books

Conferences

Criticism

Films

Newspapers

Organizations/Caucuses

Periodicals

Posters

TV Programs


Participating Writers of this History

Katz, Jonathan Ned (initiator and participating writer)


References

See also: Heterosexual Art History

  1. From the P.S.1 website: WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution, the first comprehensive, historical exhibition to examine the international foundations and legacy of feminist art. Organized by MOCA Ahmanson Curatorial Fellow Connie Butler for The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, WACK! focuses on the crucial period of the 1970s, during which the majority of feminist activism and artmaking occurred internationally. Praising the exhibition, P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center Director Alanna Heiss notes: "In addition to exploring international occurrences of feminist art, the show emphasizes New York's role in the movement, as well as its relationship with each artist involved. This is a particularly happy coincidence for P.S.1, as Connie Butler, the curator of WACK! in Los Angeles, has since last year joined the staff at the Museum of Modern Art, and will work on the very special installation of the exhibition with P.S.1 Director of Operations and Exhibitions Design Antoine Guerrero". This exhibition will be displayed on the entire First and Second Floors, and in the Third Floor Main Gallery from February 17, 2008 through May 12, 2008. The exhibition spans the period of 1965 to 1980 and includes 120 artists and artist groups from the United States, Central and Eastern Europe, Latin America, Asia, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. WACK! includes work by women who operated within the political structure of feminism as well as women who did not necessarily embrace feminism as part of their practice, but were impacted by the movement. Comprising work in a broad range of media—including painting, sculpture, photography, film, video, and performance art—the exhibition is organized around themes based on media, geography, formal concerns, collective aesthetic, and political impulses. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue. A series of performances and panel discussions presented in the Third Floor Main Gallery will connect featured artists with younger generations inspired by feminism. Click here for the full calendar. WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution is organized by The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. The presentation of the exhibition at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center is made possible by Kathy and Richard S. Fuld, Jr., Agnes Gund, Jerry I. Speyer and Katherine G. Farley, and the Joseph and Joan Cullman Foundation for the Arts, Inc. Additional support is provided by The Modern Women’s Fund, David Teiger, the New York State Council on the Arts, a State Agency, and The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art. The presentation at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles was made possible by The Annenberg Foundation. Additional generous support was provided by Geraldine and Harold Alden; The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; the National Endowment for the Arts; The Peter Norton Family Foundation; Audrey M. Irmas; The Jamie and Steve Tisch Foundation; The MOCA Contemporaries; Wells Fargo Foundation; The Broad Art Foundation; Vivian and Hans Buehler; the Barbara Lee Family Foundation Donor Advised Fund at the Boston Foundation; Étant donnés: The French-American Fund for Contemporary Art; the Robert Lehman Foundation; Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen e. V., Stuttgart; the Pasadena Art Alliance; Frances Dittmer Family Foundation; the Hugh M. Hefner Foundation; Peg Yorkin; Merrill Lynch; the Fifth Floor Foundation; The Cowles Charitable Trust; Rosette V. Delug; The Herringer Family Foundation; and the Polish Cultural Institute. Major support was also provided by Susan Bay Nimoy and Leonard Nimoy with the members of the WACK! Women's Consortium.
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